CONCEPT PROJECT

Monzo 

PROJECT DETAILS

Duration: 2 week sprint

Team size: 4

My role: UX designer

Date: January 2020

SOFTWARE USED

Sketch

Affinity designer

HOW THEY FELT

  • Confused by exchange rates

  • Conscious of spending (guilt, worry)

HOW WE HELPED

  • Clear, relatable language around rates

  • Giving the user the knowledge they need to make the best decision for their money

MY PERSONAL INPUT

  • Navigation in a team scenario

  • Development of ideas in the design studio

  • Supported my team mate in creating the Hi-fi prototype

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Discover

 

User research
GAINING INSIGHT INTO THE PROBLEM

Affinity mapping
COLLATING OUR FINDINGS INTO KEY TRENDS THAT WE CAN TAKE FORWARD

Define

 

Persona, empathy mapping and
experience mapping

CREATING A TYPICAL USER BASED ON OUR RESEARCH PHASE, SO THAT WE CAN DESIGN WITH THEM IN MIND GOING FORWARD

Problem statement
and hypothesis

DEFINING THE PROBLEM THAT OUR PERSONA TOM IS FACING, AND IDENTIFYING THE SCENARIO HE MIGHT
BE IN

Develop

 

Design studio
CREATING QUICK, FAST IDEAS ABOUT SOLUTIONS TO TOM'S PROBLEM

User flow, Scenarios and Paper prototyping
USING TOM'S JOURNEY IN ORDER TO TEST AND NAVIGATE OUR IDEAS

Mid-fidelity prototype
CREATING AN ONLINE CLICKABLE PROTOTYPE FOR USERS TO TEST IN A MORE REALISTIC SCENARIO

Deliver

 

High-fidelity prototype
CLICKABLE PROTOTYPE IN THE MONZO BRANDING

7 MINUTE READ

Brief

Discover

The challenge for this sprint was to set Monzo apart from its competitors, from whom they are experiencing stiff competition in the banking world. The brief discussed a potential route that Monzo would like to explore: Disrupting the currency exchange market. 

GAINING INSIGHT INTO THE PROBLEM

User research

We created a short set of screening questions that asked whether users were currently using overseas banking. This allowed us to narrow down a selection of interviewees, which was important as we wanted to make sure that we were interviewing users that most accurately reflected our audience.

 

From here, we devised a set of questions that each of us could ask a number of users - to understand what they were currently doing to transfer money overseas, how they felt about their experiences related to this, and what their particular pain points were.

COLLATING OUR FINDINGS INTO KEY TRENDS THAT WE CAN TAKE FORWARD

Affinity mapping

Together, we interviewed 10 users, and collated the key findings in order to identify trends that we could look into going forward.

The main trends that we identified were as follows:

  • Confusion and time wasting - many users found it frustrating to have to log in to multiple bank accounts and deal with complicated systems.

  • Knowing when to transfer - users often considered when to transfer based on current exchange rates, looked up on google or other apps.

  • Exchange rates difficult to understand - users found terminology around exchange rates confusing and complex.

Define

CREATING A TYPICAL USER BASED ON OUR RESEARCH PHASE, SO THAT WE CAN DESIGN WITH THEM IN MIND GOING FORWARD

Persona, empathy mapping and experience mapping

After gathering all of our findings from user interviews, we created a typical user that we could keep in mind during the next stages of the sprint. His goals and frustrations in particular, reflect the key points that we identified through our user research. This helped us to keep on track when designing.

We worked to understand our persona further, using empathy maps and experience maps, which helped us to learn how our user was feeling currently, and how our solution could improve this. 

The experience map shows how Tom feels at various points during his current situation.

DEFINING THE PROBLEM THAT OUR PERSONA TOM IS FACING, AND IDENTIFYING THE SCENARIO HE MIGHT BE IN

Problem statement and hypothesis

It was important at this stage that we defined a problem statement, that summed up the issue Tom was facing. This then enabled us to ideate solutions that would solve his problem.

Problem Statement: 

Tom needs to transfer money between countries when the exchange rates are favourable, because he wants to make the most out of his money.

 

Hypothesis:

We believe that by allowing Tom to transfer money between countries within Monzo when the exchange rates are favourable, we will save him valuable time and money and prevent frustration. We will know this is true if we see multiple existing users linking their overseas accounts and making transactions.
 

This initial problem statement focuses on two of the key points gathered from the user research:

  • Confusion and time wasting

  • Knowing when to transfer

 

We decided to focus on these first, as finding solutions to these two problems would provide us with our MVP (the most simple, cheap form of solution that we can create, that solves the users problem) which we could then test extensively. The third point from the user research could then be added to our solution later on and tested further.

We used a feature prioritisation map to determine which features were needed for the MVP.

Develop

CREATING QUICK, FAST IDEAS ABOUT SOLUTIONS TO TOM'S PROBLEM

Design studio

From here, we needed a way to create some quick ideas that would solve Tom’s problem. We ran a design studio, in which the whole team sketched multiple potential solutions to Tom’s problem in timed conditions. Having explained our ideas, we then used a dot voting system (each person votes three times with small dot stickers on the ideas they like the most) to narrow down solutions.

 

We then made a map with the favourite solutions (see above), prioritising features into a columns: must have, should have, would be nice and won’t have. We then began to think about how we could fit the must have column (which represents the MVP) into the existing Monzo app.

USING TOM'S JOURNEY IN ORDER TO TEST AND NAVIGATE OUR IDEAS

User flow, Scenarios and Paper prototyping

The next stage involved taking our idea and creating a user flow - showing how Tom might navigate through the app in order to achieve his goal. 

We then needed to test whether this solution would actually solve Tom’s problem. In order to do this, we created some initial prototypes on paper (a super quick and cheap way to get ideas in front of users to test how they interact with them). We provided users with a scenario that they could use to walk through our designs.

 

Scenario:

Tom wants to send 600 euros from his Spanish account to his Monzo account in the UK so that he can pay his rent next week.

We tested 12 people and recorded our findings. We asked them to use the app to walk through the scenario. We focused on findings such as: how they interacted with the buttons, what they saw first, how they felt about the experience as a whole and whether they hesitated or got stuck at any point. We grouped these findings together, and made changes to the prototype in order to improve their experience. 

CREATING AN ONLINE CLICKABLE PROTOTYPE FOR USERS TO TEST IN A MORE REALISTIC SCENARIO

Mid-fidelity prototype

After making changes based on feedback, we then began to create the journey in mid-fidelity (a more complex version of the designs in greyscale that people can test on screen so that we can see how they interact with it). 

At this stage, we also decided to bring in a rates page, that represented one of the features in the should have column,
which addresses the third key point from the user research:

  • Exchange rates difficult to understand

 

We wanted to provide users with information about exchange rates in one place that is easily accessible. We wanted to show them how the rates have looked previously, in comparison to where they are at the current moment, and inform them of any information they might need to take into consideration when transferring money going forward. We also wanted to make sure that we explained the rate in simple terms, as many of our users struggled to understand rate numbers (eg. 0.84).

We set the users a second scenario along with the first, and tested both with a selection of people.

Scenario 02:

Tom wants to use Monzo to find out more about exchange rates to see whether today is a good day to transfer money from Spain to the UK

 

We gathered lots more feedback from this round of testing, and implemented the changes.

We wanted to ensure we showed the rate in a simple, money-related way, as many users struggled to understand what exchange rate numbers (0.84) meant. 

For legal reasons, Monzo couldn't predict rates ahead of time. We removed the prediction lines and set the focus on what had happened previously, so that the users make their own decisions.

Deliver

The 2 week sprint ended with a functional Hi-Fi prototype using the Monzo branding, that walked through the various stages of Tom’s journey through app. As a team, we presented our journey through the sprint and our final Hi-Fi mockup to our course mates.

Rates page with user feedback implemented from mid-fi to hi-fi.

High-fidelity frames in Sketch.

High-fidelity walkthrough of Tom's journey.

Insights

This project was a huge learning curve for us, especially as it was our first experience of group work. We ran a retrospective at the end of the sprint to gather thoughts and insights and consider what we could have done differently. Key highlights from my personal learning over this project are as follows:

  • It is very important to establish ways of working as a team early in the process. This would have helped us spend more time focused on the work, rather than process.

  • Learning to ideate quickly and not be too attached to ideas was something we wanted to improve on as a team.

  • Complex information around exchange rates made for a large amount of time spent discussing how we could produce a viable solution. This was a really interesting part of the project, and although it was a short sprint, we were pleased with the outcome.

  • As a team, we spoke about our strengths and weaknesses going into the project, and made sure that we didn’t just to the parts of the project that suited our personal skillsets. This meant I participated a lot in the research phases, learning a huge amount. I was also then able to act as background support on the Hi-Fi design process which I enjoyed.

  • One of the most enjoyable parts of the project was hearing other people’s ideas, and being able to bounce off each other. It created a new energy, and we devised solutions that we wouldn't have been able to do alone.

What next?

From this point, we would like to focus on a few things:

  • Further scenarios based on the rates page, so that we can iterate and make sure that the page is as useful as possible

  • Further testing with users around all aspects of the app

  • Testing an ‘unhappy path’ to learn what users do when something goes wrong

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